Protester shot in chest at close range in Tsuen Wan clashes

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    By sh33pymd,

    Source: ejinsight/youtube/On.cc

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    Amateur video of violent demonstrations in Hong Kong on Tuesday captures the moment when a policeman points a pistol at a black-clad protester and fires a round, after which the young man falls to the floor. The footage, taken by students during a chaotic melee in the Tsuen Wan area of the city, is the first known instance of a protester being shot with live ammunition during weeks of clashes between police and pro-democracy campaigners.

    Police confirmed that an officer opened fire at a protester, an 18-year-old secondary five student, saying he was acting in self-defense. “A large group of rioters was attacking police officers in Tsuen Wan,” police said in a statement. “Police officers warned them, but they were still attacking police. A police officer’s life was seriously endangered. In order to save his and other officers’ lives, they fired at the attacker.” Video posted on social media shows the protester swing a baton at a policeman, brushing his right arm. When the footage is slowed down, a white flash appears at the end of the pistol barrel pointing at the protester’s chest from around a meter away. The protester stumbles over another policeman and falls on his back.

    A second protester wearing a yellow construction hat rushes to the wounded man’s aid before being tackled to the ground by police. After lying motionless for several moments, the wounded protester removes his gas mask and calls weakly for help, giving his name and saying his chest hurts and that he needs to go to hospital. A policeman then kneels beside him and begins to tend to his wound. Protesters have been hit before with bean bags and rubber bullets and officers have fired live rounds in the air.

    The incident came as thousands of protesters took to the streets to defy the city’s Chinese rulers on the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic. Police Commissioner Stephen Lo Wai-chung defended the shooting as “legal and reasonable”, stressing that the officer who opened fire had legitimately felt that his life was threatened, RTHK reported. “The officer was under attack, his life was threatened. He issued a warning to no avail, and with no other option available, used his weapon,” Lo told a press briefing. “The officer opened fire to try to get himself, or his colleagues, out of a life-threatening situation. In this very short span of time, he made a decision and shot the assailant. So I believe that was his best judgement at the time, and I think this is reasonable, and legal,” he added.

    The shooting happened after a group of protesters had pushed another officer down on the ground on Tai Ho Road in Tsuen Wan and attacked him, trying to spear him with sharpened sticks, the public broadcaster quoted Lo as saying. When his colleagues tried to come to his aid, Lo said, the assailants threw bricks and other hard objects at them. It was during then that the teenager was shot with a live round.


    Exit the Dragon: Bruce Lee’s Kowloon Tong home demolished

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: Coconuts HK/inkstonenews

    The master at work. Screengrab via YouTube.

    Bruce Lee, his wife Linda Lee Cadwell and son Brandon and daughter Shannon were pictured in the 1970s.

    The former Hong Kong mansion of Bruce Lee is now being torn down, despite calls from Lee’s fans to preserve the property known as “Crane’s Nest” as a museum. 

    The two-story, 5,700 square-foot townhouse, located in the upscale district of Kowloon Tong, was where the martial arts legend spent his final years. But it will soon be demolished to make way for a Chinese cultural studies center. The demolition work kicked off on Tuesday. In the morning, the entrance to the compound was locked, while several construction workers worked around the main building, which was surrounded by bamboo scaffolds. 

    The owner of the property said the existing building had fallen into disrepair. But the decision still disappointed Lee’s fans, who have for years lobbied the Hong Kong government to turn the site into a museum to honor the late actor, who passed away in 1973 but still has a massive global following. “The former home of a superstar is finally turning into ashes, since the property owner and the government gave up on saving it,” the Bruce Lee Club, a Hong Kong-based fan group, posted on its Facebook page on Tuesday. 

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     and raised in Hong Kong, Lee is one of Hong Kong’s most famous and universally adored 

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    .  But besides a statue on the seafront, a waxwork at Madame Tussaud’s and a temporary exhibition at the Hong Kong Heritage Museum, the city has few other tributes to Lee. Some Hongkongers visited the mansion on its last day. Eleanor Xian, 50, said she came to take photos of the house for her family members, who were loyal fans of Lee. “There’s nothing we can do,” Xian said. “Hong Kong’s land is too precious. It could only be used to make money, not for conservation.”

    Lee lived in the house with his wife Linda and two children, Shannon and Brandon, after they moved to Hong Kong in 1971 in order to further his acting career. After Lee died suddenly in 1973, his widow and children moved back to the US. The following year, Chinese businessman Yu Pang-lin, a toilet cleaner-turned-billionaire, bought the property for about HK$1 million or $127,000.

    Many of Yu’s properties were rented by love hotel operators, earning him a moniker that he detested: “Love Hotel King.” The Lee house was also converted into a love hotel that charged guests by hour. In 2010, Yu wanted to donate the place, worth millions of dollars, to the government to build a Bruce Lee museum, but the two sides failed to agree on a redevelopment plan. After Yu passed away in 2015, his entire estate, including the mansion, was donated to the Yu Panglin Charitable Trust. The trust originally tried to renovate the house. But after assessing its condition, the trust estimated that repairs could cost $2.55 million, similar to the cost of demolishing the building and erecting a new one. A new building, due to be finished next year, will house a Chinese studies center that teaches children subjects like Mandarin and Chinese music, according to the trust.


    Barber gets 160 hours community service for chopping off stranger’s ponytail on bus

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    By sh33pymd,

    Source: SCMP/On.cc

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    A Hong Kong barber was given 160 hours of community service for chopping off a stranger’s ponytail on a bus because it bothered him. Magistrate Colin Wong Sze-cheung said Allen Yu Kam-lun, 65, deserved “another chance” after learning that he was willing to receive psychiatric treatment to help mend his ways. 

    Yu had told the court that he regretted his behaviour when he pleaded guilty earlier this month to one count of assault occasioning actual bodily harm, an offence punishable by three years in jail. “I will change my ways and behave myself,” he said on Wednesday. “I will not break the law.” The magistrate said he considered Yu’s guilty plea, the nature of the case and the amount of hair lost, before he agreed to community service at the recommendation of pre-sentencing reports. Yu’s barber shears were confiscated at the last hearing.

    Eastern Court previously heard Yu admitted to cutting the hair of Ting Wai-lam, a 25-year-old engineer, while they were on a Citybus travelling to Aberdeen on January 13. When confronted by Ting, Yu said: “Your hair was getting in my way.” He later admitted to investigators that he had acted on impulse and realised he was wrong. Prosecutors revealed that Yu had 41 prior convictions, most of them acts of dishonesty. But four cases involved violence, including common assault, wounding and fighting in a public place. 

    Eight injured in morning MTR derailment

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    By sh33pymd,

    Source: SCMP/On.cc/Youtube

    A train has derailed on the East Rail line, where services have been partly closed. Photo: Felix Wong

    An MTR source says no passengers were injured during the derailing incident. Photo: Felix Wong

    A train was derailed near a major interchange in Hong Kong on Tuesday, leading to a partial suspension of the East Rail line and two investigations.

    Services between Mong Kok East and Hung Hom stations were shut down from about 8.30am on Tuesday after three of the train’s 12 carriages came off the track, rail operator the MTR Corporation said. It was approaching Hong Hom when the accident happened. Eight of the about 500 passengers on board were injured, with one man and four women later sent to hospital with a sore neck or shoulders, or cuts to their arms, according to the fire service.

    Calling the incident “extremely serious”, Secretary for Transport and Housing Frank Chan Fan, who was on the scene from about 10.30am, pledged a full official investigation, while MTR managers vowed to set up an investigative panel of their own. MTR Corp operations director Adi Lau Tin-shing apologised on behalf of the company. “For the inconvenience caused to our passengers due to this incident ... we offer our sincere apology. For our injured passengers, we extend our deepest sympathy,” Lau said. It was understood the derailment happened at a diverting point, where trains are directed to different platforms or other locations, their direction and speed controlled by computer.

    According to documents seen by the Post, a section of rail between the two stations was scheduled to be replaced during Tuesday’s early hours. An insider source confirmed that the work went ahead, and was in the area where the derailment happened. Lau confirmed the work happened near the site of the accident, but said it was not on the same stretch of track. He also confirmed the authenticity of photographs circulating online of a crack in the rail, which had been speculatively blamed for the derailment. “We can’t be sure if the crack was the cause of the derailing,” he said, adding that it was too soon to tell whether it was there before the derailment, or caused by it. He also said he saw no link between the derailment and the fact that the train was heading into a diverting point.

    Alfred Sit Wing-hang, director of the Electrical and Mechanical Services Department, which would investigate the accident on the government’s behalf, said he hoped the probe would be done in three to six months. “We are striving to conduct an independent, comprehensive and speedy investigation in order to get to the bottom of the truth,” he said. Pledging full cooperation, Lau said the MTR Corp would set up an investigative panel of external experts, which would also conduct an in-depth probe. He said his staff would first have to scour the train and track for evidence. Then they would have to arrange cranes to move the train so it could be sent back to the depot for further checks, he said.Chief of operations engineering Tony Lee Kar-yun said the removal would pose challenges as staff would have to move the battered carriages through a web of overhead electricity cables.Lau therefore expected repairs to take some time: “The services at Mong Kok East are unlikely to resume by today, although we will try our best.”Given the city’s ongoing anti-government protests, during which hardline demonstrators have taken aim at train stations, Chan was asked about the possibility the derailment was orchestrated by protesters. 

    A female passenger described the moment of derailment as an explosion, before she was stretchered away from Hung Hom station. A man, who gave his surname as Kwok, was seen at the station in a wheelchair. He said he had knocked his head when the train derailed. Kwok told reporters he heard a strange noise, after which the carriage began shaking and veering from side to side. The carriage he was in held 40 to 50 passengers, mostly women, and at least one child. Kwok said he helped them leave before he was tended to by first-aid workers. Another man, who was on the carriage next to one that broke off, said there was no announcement or guidance from the train conductor or MTR staff and passengers made the decision to leave the carriage by themselves as dust, smoke and debris began filling the air.

    Images circulating online showed passengers leaving the carriage, which stood across two sets of tracks, through a damaged train door. They were seen walking along the tracks to safety.A senior source at the corporation said earlier it had not found any suspicious objects on the track. The area where the derailment happened was closed off, the source added, hinting that it would have been difficult for anyone to get in and cause disruption.Lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting urged the MTR Corp to thoroughly investigate the incident.“It is fortunate there have not been any serious injuries or casualties, but if the train was going at high speed, the situation could have been worse,” Lam said, speaking at a briefing outside the Legislative Council building. 

    Pan-democrat lawmaker Wu Chi-wai, who was also at the briefing, said the MTR Corp should make sure the signalling system was working in sync with the track diversion system to prevent further incidents. Trains on the West Rail line were also affected, but normal service was resumed by 11.40am. Tuesday’s incident was the second time a train carrying passengers had derailed in the MTR Corp’s 40-year history.It was also the corporation’s second major incident this year. In March, two trains without passengers crashed during an out-of-hours service trial of a new signalling system near Central station, causing services between Central and Admiralty stations to close for 48 hours on the Tsuen Wan line. 


    Police arrest man suspected of flashing boycotting students

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: Coconuts HK/On.cc

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    A Hong Kong man was arrested yesterday for allegedly flashing his junk at a group of students taking part in a citywide school boycott, “daring” them to take photos and put them online. Well, unsurprisingly, they did.

    Police soon picked up a 57-year-old suspect in the case, surnamed So, at the Fu Heng Estate in Tai Po at about 4:45pm yesterday afternoon 

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    , on.cc reports. So is believed to have approached a group of students who were forming a human chain outside the Tai Yuen Estate — about a 10 minute walk away from Fu Heng — at around 7:30am yesterday morning, and pulled down his trousers and underpants exposing himself to the students. The outlet reported that several people in black shirts — the color favored by anti-government protesters — tried to block the man from getting near the students. So allegedly began yelling at the students, “Take a photo and put it online! I dare you!” He finally left the scene after about 15 minutes. The incident comes hot on the heels of another incident in which an older man, this one shirtless, 

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    . The suspect in that case was arrested the same evening at his home in Kowloon Bay.


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