Gambling king Stanley Ho dies aged 98

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: The Straits Times/On.cc

    bkn-20200526132702286-0526_00822_001_01p.jpg?20200526160619

    Macau gambling tycoon Stanley Ho (centre) died on May 26 at the age of 98.

    Mr Stanley Ho, a one-time kerosene trader who built a casino empire in Macau that propelled the Chinese island past Las Vegas as the world’s 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
    , has died at age 98, local media reported. 

    Known as the King of Gambling, Mr Ho dominated gaming in the former Portuguese colony after winning a monopoly licence in 1961. His SJM Holdings flourished as China’s economic opening created a flood of new wealth in a country with a passion for gambling. SJM now controls 20 casinos on an island of about 26 sq km.  Mr Ho’s rise transformed Macau from a commercial backwater into the “Las Vegas of Asia” by exploiting its big advantage over the rest of China – casinos were legal. As his fortune swelled, he expanded beyond the island, building residential and office buildings in Hong Kong.

    In 1984, he won a licence to operate a casino in Portugal and spent US$30 million to open the Casino Pyongyang in North Korea in 2000. Mr  Ho’s Macau monopoly expired in 2001, two years after China regained control of the island from Portugal. China then granted licences to competitors, including 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
     and Wynn Resorts. Rather than hurting Mr Ho, the increased competition, coupled with China’s booming economy, accelerated Macau’s growth into the world’s biggest gaming hub and Mr Ho’s fortunes ballooned. 

    The city’s gaming revenue has become a barometer of the economy of China, where two-thirds of its gamblers are from. While casino takings have usually grown with China’s GDP, it plummeted in 2014 when China launched an anti-corruption campaign and again in 2020, after 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
     triggered a 97 per cent drop in revenue as Chinese gamblers were prevented from travel into the enclave. 

    Mr Ho fathered 17 children with four women and when he retired around mid-2018, he passed some of the top roles at SJM to his heirs. Ms Daisy Ho, his daughter, became chairman and executive director. Ms Angela Leong, SJM’s second-largest shareholder whom Mr Ho referred to as his fourth wife, became co-chairman with another executive director.  Still, the succession reopened long-simmering family rivalries. In January 2019, Pansy, his eldest daughter with his second wife, joined forces with some siblings in an alliance that holds sway over a controlling stake in SJM, giving her the upper hand over Ms Leong in the 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
     of Mr Ho’s US$14.9 billion(S$21 billion)  empire. Pansy, one of Hong Kong’s richest people, is also executive chairman of Shun Tak Holdings, which runs most of the ferries between Hong Kong and Macau. 


    Mother, daughter die from fall

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: The Standard/Appledaily

    BOYFQESSVX4ZYP6PLTWP2OZHWU.jpg

    XGGXANJERIJPFUWU72ODA3S3ZE.jpg

    A 71-year-old woman and her 41-year-old daughter died at the scene after falling from a height in Tseung Kwan O at about 9:00am today. The police said they are believed to have fallen from a unit at Block 2 of Metropolis, Metro City Phase 3. No suicide note was found.

    The case has been classified as suicide pact and it is being handled by the Tseung Kwan O District regional crime unit. The daughter reportedly suffered from congenital bowel disease and required frequent hospital visits.


    Aaron Kwok to hold fundraising concert to help city’s struggling dancers and film industry workers

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: SCMP/MingPao/straitstimes.com

    The concert will be livestreamed on Facebook and YouTube.

    030520_news_guofucheng.jpg?itok=7gwQcXt5

    Canto-pop star Aaron Kwok Fu-shing is to throw a charity concert online on Saturday to raise funds for dancers and film crew hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. The Cheer Up & Dance concert will be held from 5pm to 6pm.

    Kwok, 54, said the performance would help raise funds for the city’s professional dancers and crew in the film industry, who barely benefit from the government’s HK$138 billion relief package. “I’m a dancer and an actor … I hope the concert can help raise some funding for people working in the entertainment industry to meet their urgent needs.” Kwok said. “The industry that has been bringing entertainment to people is facing difficulties. Some people lost their jobs and some switched to other professions.”

    Kwok will lead about 100 dancers in performing in the concert after being inspired by Canto-pop legend Sam Hui’s charity concert last month. “Some of the performers are retired dancers, some changed profession and some were injured … We hope to encourage people amid the pandemic and cheer up Hong Kong,” he said
    The concert is co-hosted by the celebrity’s charity foundation, Aaron Kwok Love and Concern International Charity Fund, and YouTube channel Health Egg, and will be live-streamed on Facebook and YouTube.
     
    Kwok, whose mother died three months ago, said the date of the concert, one day before Mother’s Day, was to send blessings to all mothers, and remind people to pay tributes to their mothers on Sunday. Sam Hui, 71, raised more than HK$372,000 from a one-hour concert streamed live from the rooftop of the Harbour City shopping complex on the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront. Some 1,000 online users donated HK$72,000, former MTR Corporation chairman Frederick Ma Si-hang gave HK$50,000 and Hui pumped in HK$250,000 of his own money, all for workers from sound production company Tom Lee Engineering who had lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

    The concert attracted a live global audience of more than 2.5 million people, and was viewed a total of 6.4 million times in 24 hours.


    Carrie Lam rejects bipartisan calls to turn down pay rise

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source: SCMP/On,cc

    oncc_odn_news_20200407.jpg

    Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s annual salary is set to jump to US$672,000. Photo: Robert Ng

    Chief Executive Carrie Lam’s annual salary is set to jump to US$672,000. Photo: Robert Ng
     
    Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has announced that country’s ministers will forgo three months’ salary. Photo: Reuters
    Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has announced that country’s ministers will forgo three months’ salary. Photo: Reuters
    Hong Kong’s embattled leader has dismissed calls from across the political spectrum to take a voluntary pay freeze, after it was revealed her annual salary had increased to HK$5.21 million (US$672,000). Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor’s 2.36 per cent pay rise, up from HK$5.09 million in the 2019/20 financial year, means she continues to be one of the highest-paid political leaders in the world.

    In a media briefing on Tuesday morning, Lam was asked if she would heed lawmaker demands to turn down the increase. “My first priority right now is to finalise as early as possible the package of relief measures under the second round of anti-epidemic funding,” she said. The chief executive also pointed out that she and the city’s other politically appointed officials had recently donated one month’s pay to the Community Chest of Hong Kong for charity purposes, adding she would consider similar ways in future “to demonstrate solidarity with the people of Hong Kong”.

    The Legislative Council has been scrutinising the government budget, unveiled in February, ahead of an expected final vote in early May.
    According to the public spending blueprint for 2020/21, Lam’s annual salary increased by HK$120,000, an increase the city leader clarified had taken effect in July, raising her salary to HK$434,000 a month. Lawmakers from both the pro-establishment and pan-democratic camps were furious, demanding she take her cues from foreign officials and impose a pay cut instead, when the city is fighting against the deadly Covid-19 pandemic.
     
    Pro-business Liberal Party leader Felix Chung Kwok-pan and the party’s three honorary chairs – James Tien Pei-chun, Miriam Lau Kin-yee and Selina Chow Liang Shuk-yee – sent a letter to Lam on Tuesday, urging her to initiate a pay cut. “We are shocked and dismayed to hear that you still find it conscionable to accept a salary increase for yourself and your team at this time of unprecedented crisis that Hong Kong is painfully facing now,” the letter read.

    In Singapore, the government of Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced in February that political office holders in the city state would take a month’s pay cut. That was followed in March by the announcement of another two-month pay cut in what was termed a show of solidarity with Singaporeans experiencing economic hardships due to the pandemic. Hong Kong’s embattled leader has dismissed calls from across the political spectrum to take a voluntary pay freeze, after it was revealed her annual salary had increased to HK$5.21 million (US$672,000).

    Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor’s 2.36 per cent pay rise, up from HK$5.09 million in the 2019/20 financial year, means she continues to be one of the highest-paid political leaders in the world. In a media briefing on Tuesday morning, Lam was asked if she would heed lawmaker demands to turn down the increase. “My first priority right now is to finalise as early as possible the package of relief measures under the second round of anti-epidemic funding,” she said. 

    The chief executive also pointed out that she and the city’s other politically appointed officials had recently donated one month’s pay to the Community Chest of Hong Kong for charity purposes, adding she would consider similar ways in future “to demonstrate solidarity with the people of Hong Kong”.

    The Legislative Council has been scrutinising the government budget, unveiled in February, ahead of an expected final vote in early May. According to the public spending blueprint for 2020/21, Lam’s annual salary increased by HK$120,000, an increase the city leader clarified had taken effect in July, raising her salary to HK$434,000 a month. Lawmakers from both the pro-establishment and pan-democratic camps were furious, demanding she take her cues from foreign officials and impose a pay cut instead, when the city is fighting against the deadly Covid-19 pandemic.
     
    Pro-business Liberal Party leader Felix Chung Kwok-pan and the party’s three honorary chairs – James Tien Pei-chun, Miriam Lau Kin-yee and Selina Chow Liang Shuk-yee – sent a letter to Lam on Tuesday, urging her to initiate a pay cut. “We are shocked and dismayed to hear that you still find it conscionable to accept a salary increase for yourself and your team at this time of unprecedented crisis that Hong Kong is painfully facing now,” the letter read.

    In Singapore, the government of Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced in February that political office holders in the city state would take a month’s pay cut. That was followed in March by the announcement of another two-month pay cut in what was termed a show of solidarity with Singaporeans experiencing economic hardships due to the pandemic.

    South Korean Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun also said last month that his country’s ministers and deputies would yield 30 per cent of their monthly salaries through June, equivalent to 10 per cent of their annual pay. On Tuesday, Lam said the July pay adjustment was made according to a pre-existing mechanism that lawmakers themselves had voted to approve in 2017. “It’s not the case that officials raised the salary increase in the Legislative Council [because they are scrutinising] spending,” she said.

    A spokesman for the government issued a statement on Monday night, saying the Legislative Council Finance Committee in 2017 approved an adjustment mechanism that – from July 1, 2018 – took into account the average annual Consumer Price Index. Lam’s predecessor, Leung Chun-ying, in 2015 freezed his own pay and that of his cabinet ministers after an 8.1 per cent salary increase recommended by an independent commission drew criticisms.

    In 2009, in response to the financial crisis, politically appointed officials in Hong Kong took a 5.38 per cent salary cut of their own accord. At a Legco finance committee meeting on Monday, pro-establishment lawmakers joined the opposition in slamming Lam for failing to do the same. Lawmaker Michael Tien Puk-sun, of the political group Roundtable, said it was “very ridiculous” for Lam to accept a salary increase while the city’s business sectors are facing difficulty. New People's Party lawmaker Eunice Yung Hoi-yan also said the government should bear the responsibility to overcome hardships with citizens.


    Bizarre pics of man ‘kissing people’s feet’ on the MTR shared widely

    sh33pymd
    By sh33pymd,

    Source:  Coconuts UK

    Photo: Tai Po 大埔 via Facebook

     

    Since the 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
    , we’ve seen plenty of photos of the amusing and resourceful ways that Hongkongers are protecting themselves from germs, with some (full-body astronaut costumes) more effective than others (snorkels, bras, a surgical mask worn over the eyes).

    Last week, a new set of “man on the street” photos started making the rounds online – but instead of depicting some ingenious distancing method or DIY hygiene measure, the pictures showed a man apparently kissing the bare feet of various MTR passengers. We’re not here to judge what gets people going, but between the public health crisis and the (reported) lack of consent, this is alarming, to say the least.

    Photos of a bald man removing a young boy’s sock on an Island Line train were first shared on a Facebook group for Shau Kei Wan residents last Thursday afternoon. In the caption, the poster said she saw the man get on the train at Shau Kei Wan, approach two schoolboys and begin talking to them.

    “The kid with the backpack was smart and stood up very quickly, but the other one didn’t react as fast. […] The bald guy took off [the second boy’s] shoe and sock, kissed him on the sole of his foot, and got off the train at Sai Wan Ho,” she wrote. “After he left, I went over and gave the boy a disinfectant wipe to clean his foot and asked him if he knew the man. He said no.”

    Despite the fact that he physically harassed a child in a public place – during a goddamn pandemic, no less – the man apparently continued riding the rails, footloose and face mask-free. Later that day, a member of a Tai Po Facebook group shared pictures of a similar-looking bald man kissing and rubbing his face against the bare feet of an adult man in a red T-shirt.

    According to Headline Daily, 

    Hidden Content

      Like this post or reply to this topic to see the hidden content.
    , “[the red-shirted man] couldn’t escape and was gripping onto the poles to stop [the bald man] from pulling him to the floor. The rest of us passengers kept a safe distance and were watching it as if it was a performance.”

    We have so many questions, namely: “Why?” and “Hey man, is your name Zac Efron? Because this is Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile”. We’re not shaming anyone’s kinks, but we do have a problem with people who harass children, ignore consent, and endanger the health of others. Sadly, we don’t have any answers, but please let us know if you have any more information about this man and his reign of toe-tal terror.

     

     


Portal by DevFuse · Based on IP.Board Portal by IPS